Megan. 24. I will post about all sorts of random things, but primarily about fantastic British actors, classic film, modern television, Tolkien, and occasionally Japanese culture and anime. My tastes are scattered, but I like what I like.
Posted: 6 hours ago ● 225,504 notesReblog

roy-ality:

mightyhealthyquest:

IT’S ALWAYS TEA TIME!

this is important.

(via erymanthos11)

Posted: 6 hours ago ● 40,991 notesReblog

getintherobot:

tickatocka:

i want someone who’s never seen b99 to explain this screencap

image

is this live action cowboy bebop

(via radiorcrist)

#omg 
Posted: 4 days ago ● 2,016 notesReblog

bardbowdamn:

lotr meme | 5/7 places

Lothlórien

(via mrpuddingston)

Posted: 6 days ago ● 7 notesReblog

Lost in Translation: The Crunchyroll Cardcaptor Sakura Sub

culturallyschizo:

Yes, that’s right. The sub. Everyone knows that the dub is a heinous shadow of the original anime. But the new and much anticipated sub that came to Crunchyroll this past August has problems of its own.

I had recently rewatched the series before I even knew it was coming…

Glad I’m not the only one! It’s good to know that it’s not Crunchyroll’s fault. Thanks for correcting me on that. I haven’t noticed this problem with them before, so it makes sense that the fault lies with a different company. But it’s truly sad that the remastered DVD version is now permanently tainted with these terrible subs.

Posted: 6 days ago ● 7 notesReblog

Lost in Translation: The Crunchyroll Cardcaptor Sakura Sub

Yes, that’s right. The sub. Everyone knows that the dub is a heinous shadow of the original anime. But the new and much anticipated sub that came to Crunchyroll this past August has problems of its own.

I had recently rewatched the series before I even knew it was coming to Crunchyroll, and today I thought I’d check it out. My mom and I were planning on making homemade tempura, so I put on episode 28: Sakura and the Enchanted Cards— where Sakura gets over her fear of hot oil and learns to make potato croquettes.

Right off the bat, I noticed that they were spelling Meilin and Syaoran’s names according to their Chinese pronunciation. This wouldn’t matter if CLAMP didn’t have established naming conventions, but it still felt strange to me having to read “Xialong” in place of Syaoran. But they’re both Chinese and those are technically their names, so I let it slide.

But then, Sakura calls out to Syaoran. At this point in the anime they are still not very close, so she appropriately calls him Li-kun. The Crunchyroll sub translated this to his first name, “Xialong.” Calling a person by their first name in Japan suggests a level of closeness that the original script was not prepared to give them. Why would Crunchyroll do this? Did they think anime fans who are watching a subbed anime and bothered to buy a subscription to Crunchyroll couldn’t grasp basic tenets of Japanese culture? This is a problem, because what Sakura and Syaoran call each other becomes a subtle character point that identifies to themselves and other characters how close they are with each other. It’s directly referenced in the plot later on— by themselves and others.

Skipping ahead, I immediately checked episode 57: Sakura, Syaoran, and the Elevator, when Syaoran calls her “Sakura” for the first time. No doubt the significance of this moment, when he realizes the fact that calling her by her first name is an absolute sign that he loves her, was unfortunately lost on most as well. When she calls him to say how happy she was to hear him call her by her first name, and asks him if she can call him “Syaoran-kun” too, Crunchyroll decided to steamroll over this part with a lame line about how happy she was that they were close friends now. This is a cop-out and not at all the same thing. A throwaway line about friendship doesn’t signify any substantial change or growth that would allow Syaoran to accept his feelings.

I haven’t checked yet to see how they resolve Meilin telling Syaoran that she knew that he liked her when she hears Sakura call him by his first name, an honor that, until then, only Meilin and Syaoran’s sisters had been capable of achieving. Just “being friends” as the Crunchyroll sub suggests completely barrels over this sense of character development— that Syaoran is a person so closed off that he only lets his family and one other person call him by his first name. And then Sakura.

This bothers me mainly because Crunchyroll is tooting its own horn with this, and fans who are only now just seeing the subbed version for the first time aren’t going to be seeing it at its full potential. They’re still seeing a watered down, censored version that’s deemed more “fitted” to foreigners. It’s a small change, I know, but I find it sickening and insulting. I wonder if anyone else feels this way.